Article

 

It happens faster than you think and you lose the most precious thing in your life.
You go to get the camera, answer the telephone or turn the stove off. You think that you children are far away from the pool, and you can make it back before they even close to the edge of the water.
Wrong. They are faster than you think.
You think that you are only in the second room and the bathtub is a safe place, or it does not have enough water. Wrong. It only takes a few seconds for your child to go face down in the water and either drown or sustain life-long disabilities. Don’t take that chance. You will never forgive yourself. It only takes minimum planning to save their lives.
As the weather is getting better, families are are spending time a lot of time near water. It is estimated that 10 children die everyday from drowning. Protect your precious loved ones. Teach them how to float. Be with them all the time when they are near water. Take them with you to answer the telephone, check on the food or get the camera. Do not leave them unattended at any time.
Blake and Kathy Collingsworth learned the hard way. Their son was perfect in every way. A few seconds later, he was in the pool face up. A few hours later he was on life-support and did not make. They started a foundation Josh the Otter to spread awareness about water safety. Their message for children is simple: Stay away from the water unless accompanied by an adult.
http://www.joshtheotter.org
Secondary Drowning
While drowning is a fear of every parent, secondary drowning often goes undetected. It comes after a near-drowning experience, when water gets sucked up into the lungs when someone is struggling for air user water.
At first, children appear okay, but 48 hours later, that inhaled water can be deadly, blocking the lungs from doing its function.
What should you watch for:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/health/Signs-to-prevent-secondary-drowning-in-children-261318481.html
If the child gets out of the water coughing or having a hard time breathing for an extended period of time, that could be an indication to get help.
Watch for the child's energy level, are they lethargic?
Watch to see if they are pale, or cool to the touch, really any indication that the child is sick.
Adults can die from this as well, but not as often because they tend to recognize the signs sooner.
If you see any of these signs after a near-drowning experience, call 911 or go to the emergency room.
Read more about secondary drowning
https://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/every-parent-needs-know-secondary-drowning-162500883.html

Protect your children from drowning

It happens faster than you think, and you lose the most precious things in your life.

You go to get the camera, answer the telephone or turn the stove off. You think that your children are far away from the pool, and you can make it back before they even get closer to the edge of the water.

Wrong. They are faster than you think.


Your children are playing happily in the bathtub and you think that you are only going to the adjacent room, and that the bathtub is a safe place, or it does not have enough water.

Wrong again. It only takes a few seconds for your child to go face down in the water and either drown or sustain life-long disability. Don’t take that chance. It only takes minimum planning to keep your children safe and keep your sanity.

As the weather gets warmer, families are spending a lot of time near water. It is estimated that 10 children die everyday from drowning. Protect your precious loved ones. Teach them how to float. Be with them all the time when they are near water. Take them with you to answer the telephone, check on the food or get the camera. Do not leave them unattended at anytime.

Blake and Kathy Collingsworth learned the hard way. Their son was perfect in every way. A few seconds later, he was in the pool face down. A few hours later he was on life-support and did not survive. They started a foundation Josh the Otter to spread awareness about water safety. Their message for children is simple: Stay away from the water unless accompanied by an adult.

Secondary Drowning

While drowning is a fear of every parent, secondary drowning often goes undetected. It comes after a near-drowning experience, when water gets sucked up into the lungs when someone is struggling for air user water.

At first, children appear okay, but 48 hours later, that inhaled water can be deadly, blocking the lungs from doing its function.


What should you watch for:

  • If the child gets out of the water coughing or having a hard time breathing for an extended period of time, that could be an indication to get help.
  • Watch for the child's energy level, are they lethargic?
  • Watch to see if they are pale, or cool to the touch, really any indication that the child is sick.
  • Adults can die from this as well, but not as often because they tend to recognize the signs sooner.
  • If you see any of these signs after a near-drowning experience, call 911 or go to the emergency room.


Read more about secondary drowning

1123 days ago
 
Recommend
 
Back to Top