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The Michigan School Reform Office announced this month that it would close 38 low-performing schools, but these schools house either new programs or poor children.

Instead of closing them, if the state tries to fix these schools and help poor children learn, we may be better off in the long term. Closing schools in poor areas will divert students to other schools, which would require new programs to improve the learning level of the incoming students, a burden that is both financial and labor intensive.

I am sure that the issue is more complicated than just keeping schools open or closing them, but if we employ our resources correctly and develop a more rigorous process to open schools, we could avoid such dilemma we are having now.

We urge the state to study the issue further and work with the schools to keep them all open or some of them to avoid making poor kids pay the price.
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